Tuesday, February 3, 2015

Studies Indicate that Vitamin K2 Protects Against Coronary Heart Disease


 
Katie Jodscheidt, NASM-CPT, FNS
Founder of Innerzyme
 
Worldwide, cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death1, with over 7 million deaths each year attributed to the specific cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease (CHD)2. CHD, the main cause of heart attacks3, results from atherosclerosis, the narrowing of the inside of the artery. The plaque that builds up within arteries results in decreased blood flow to the heart. This is comparable to your drain clogging after the pipes gradually collect gunk inside. The main risk factors for CHD are smoking, genetics, obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, lack of exercise and stress4.
 
To combat coronary heart disease, doctors commonly utilize drugs and invasive procedures or surgeries5. In addition to, or in lieu of these sometimes-aggressive treatments, many employ lifestyle changes and take supplements to fight or prevent CHD. In order to determine specific risk factors related to cardiovascular diseases as well as others, a group of researchers in the Netherlands began an extensive population-based research effort called The Rotterdam Study6. Since 1989 the group has regularly interviewed and examined 15,000 elderly people within a specific district in the city of Rotterdam. With such a large number of localized subjects in this unique study, the scientists have the statistical power to determine whether or not specific risk factors are related to certain diseases. It is important to note that although these researchers can determine the relationship between risk and disease, they cannot determine whether a factor causes a disease or not.
 
In a seminal research paper generated by the Rotterdam Study, scientists and doctors determined that increased consumption of Vitamin K2 is correlated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease7, building upon numerous studies describing the inhibitory effect of Vitamin K-dependent proteins on atherosclerosis. The Rotterdam researchers assessed the diet of nearly 8000 subjects using a validated semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire conducted by trained dieticians. The concentration of Vitamin K2 and other micronutrients in common Dutch foods were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography, an analytical chemistry technique to separate, determine and quantify components of complex mixtures. Comprehensive clinical examinations were performed on all patients, including thorough blood work and assessment of atherosclerosis.
 
When the researchers assessed Vitamin K2 levels, they first noticed higher quantities in patients with greater total fat, saturated fat and calcium intake. Moreover they found higher levels in individuals with higher body mass index (body fat) and diabetes. Conversely they noticed lower Vitamin K2 levels in subjects with higher polyunsaturated fat (omega-3, omega-6, DHA, etc.). Furthermore, when analyzing cholesterol levels they found an inverse association with total cholesterol and a positive correlation with HDL (healthy cholesterol). Interestingly, Vitamin K2 intake was not correlated to a healthy lifestyle or diet, although some of the individual associations may suggest this.
 
Excitement arose when the researchers looked at the relationship between Vitamin K2 intake and coronary heart disease. To do this, they arranged patients into three evenly sized groups based on their Vitamin K2 levels (low, medium and high). When examining the high Vitamin K2 group the scientists discovered a strong and significant decrease in CHD incidence and CHD-related deaths.
 
Moreover there was a significant reduction in death from any cause in this group. In agreement with the coronary heart disease findings the researchers also found that patients with severe atherosclerosis had lower Vitamin K2. What is striking about these findings is that they still stand when the researchers adjusted for every other factor, including smoking, education, and diet. Additionally the researchers excluded subjects with previous heart attacks from their analysis in order to avoid a bias resulting from intentional changes in diet or lifestyle.
 
Altogether these data suggest that dietary intake of Vitamin K2 has a protective effect against coronary heart disease and death. Although this study does not prove Vitamin K2 specifically deters CHD, it provides additional support for a causal relationship between this dietary micronutrient and heart disease. Since this study was published, other groups have found similarly encouraging results. For instance, researchers discovered that for post-menopausal women, increased consumption of Vitamin K2 lowered the risk of atherosclerosis8. With the mounting evidence for Vitamin K2 reducing the risk of coronary heart disease the International Life Sciences Institute recently recommended taking Vitamin K29. Since it can be hard to consume the recommended amount of Vitamin K2 with a standard diet, taking a natural Vitamin K2 supplement, like Innerzyme Vitamin K2, MK-7, 300mcg can be advantageous. It will be exciting to learn more about the additional benefits of Vitamin K2 in the coming years, as it is an active area of research for many scientific and medical professionals.
 
References:

1.     Global status report on noncommunicable diseases 2010. World Health Organization (2011).
3.     "Heart attack/coronary artery disease". Mount Sinai Hospital, New York.
4.     "Causes". Coronary artery disease. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (2012).
5.     Jameson et al., "Harrison's principles of internal medicine" (16th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill Medical Publishing Division (2005).
6.     Hofman et al., “Determinants of disease and disability in the elderly: the Rotterdam Elderly Study” European Journal of Epidemiology 7:403–422 (1991).
7.     Geleijnse et al., “Dietary intake of menaquinone is associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease: the Rotterdam Study” Journal of Nutrition 134(11):3100-3105 (2004).
8.     Beulens et al., “High dietary menaquinone intake is associated with reduced coronary calcification” Atherosclerosis 203(2):489-93 (2009).
9.     Beulens et al., “The role of menaquinones (vitamin K₂) in human health” Journal of Nutrition 110(8):1357-68 (2013).

About the Author:
 
Katie Jodscheidt is a Fitness Nutrition Specialist and Certified Personal Trainer through the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM). Katie is passionate about helping others improve their overall quality of life by improving their health. Her mission is to educate people on how to live a healthy lifestyle through proper diet, exercise and nutritional supplementation. With years of research on natural health alternatives and collaborating with highly trained physicians around the world, Katie Jodscheidt founded Innerzyme in 2011. Innerzyme is revolutionizing the natural health industry with specially formulated, ethically created nutritional supplements including Vitamin K2, MK-7, 300mcg and a full range of digestive and systemic enzyme supplements. 
 
All Innerzyme supplements are made in the USA in a cGMP certified facility. For more information, visit www.innerzyme.com.
 


Buy Innerzyme Vitamin K2, MK-7, 300mcg from one of our authorized internet retailers:

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Tuesday, December 30, 2014

Vitamin K2 and Parkinson's: High Profile Studies of Vitamin K2 Provide Hope for Parkinson's Patients

December 30, 2014
Katie Jodscheidt, NASM-CPT, FNS
A study from the laboratory of Patrik Verstreken published in the prestigious journal Science describes an exciting discovery in relation to Parkinson’s-related PINK1 deficiency. Specifically, they discovered that vitamin K2 alleviates the negative effects of the Parkinson’s specific PINK1 mutations in fruit flies.

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder affecting the central nervous system. This devastating disease affects part of the brain associated with critical functions, such as vision, hearing and movement1. With an absence of definitive markers for Parkinson’s, diagnosis is made on a clinical basis. With 60,000 new cases every year in the U.S. there are nearly one million American’s living with PD, costing an astounding $25 billion per year2. The most obvious symptoms of PD are shaking, rigidity and slow movement, exemplified by the famous PD patient, actor Michael J. Fox3. The symptoms are a result of the death of a specific type of cell in the aforementioned midbrain that produces dopamine, resulting in lower levels of this neurotransmitter that is crucial for regulation of movement and other functions.

For many patients there are no definitive causes or risk factors for Parkinson’s disease, most likely being triggered by a combination of genetic and environmental factors (mix of nature and nurture). On the other hand, some PD cases are attributed to mutations in specific genes4. These mutations have adverse effects on the function of the proteins in which they code for, resulting in significant biological defects. One such Parkinson’s gene is PINK15,6,7. PINK1 functions in “powerhouse” of the cell, the mitochondria, and is involved with neuron differentiation8.

A study from the laboratory of Patrik Verstreken published in the prestigious journal Science describes an exciting discovery in relation to Parkinson’s-related PINK1 deficiencyI9. Specifically, they discovered that vitamin K2 alleviates the negative effects of the Parkinson’s specific PINK1 mutations in fruit flies. Flies are one the most prevalently used organisms in genetic and biological studies. Their utility lies within their ease of use, as well as the fact that the inner workings and cellular activities of these little animals reflect what occurs within our cells. Conservation of machinery and processes between flies and humans results in the majority of scientific discoveries in flies holding true for humans as well.

The Verstreken lab discovered the connection between PINK1 and vitamin K2 by beginning their experiments with a poor flying PINK1 mutant fly. Subsequently, they selectively looked for additional mutations in the flies that resulted in poorer flight ability. The rationale behind this standard genetic approach was to find genes that were involved in the same processes as PINK1, with the hypothesis that a poorer flying mutant would have a mutation in something related to PINK1’s role in flight. They found that the worst flying double mutant had an additional mutation in the HEIX gene, which is involved in vitamin K2 synthesis in bacteria and humans.

With the data suggesting that vitamin K2 is involved with PINK1 in flight, they asked whether feeding PINK1 mutant fruit flies vitamin K2 could alleviate their poor flight, as well as other symptoms. Amazingly, PINK deficient flies fed vitamin K2 had significantly improved flight, energy levels, and survival rates compared to flies not supplemented with vitamin K2. Encouragingly, the observed improvements with vitamin K2 were dose-dependent and time-dependent, characteristic of prototypical drugs and supplements. Further experiments demonstrated that the improvements were most likely due to improved mitochondria function, meaning more efficient energy production. Digging even deeper, the researchers discovered that vitamin K2 could transport electrons, an essential step in energy production.

Altogether the experimental results described in this paper constitute a significant leap in our scientific understanding of the potential of vitamin K2, as well as encouraging news for those suffering from Parkinson’s. Since the publication of the Verstreken lab’s findings researchers have found that vitamin K2 synthesis is also crucial for embryonic and vascular development10,11. Adding to the encouragement is the fact that vitamin K2 is a natural form of vitamin K. These new discoveries, as well as the general nature of vitamin K2’s improvement of energy production provide ample support for the idea that vitamin K2 can help people suffering from other diseases and disorders, as well as a general supplement to improve overall health and well-being.

References:
1.     Breedlove et. al., Biological Psychology, 6th Edition, 2010.
3.     Brockes, "It's the gift that keeps on taking"The Guardian, 11 April 2009.
5.     Valente et. al., (2004). "Hereditary early-onset Parkinson's disease caused by mutations in PINK1"Science 304 (5674): 1158–60 (2014).
6.     Pimenta de Castro et. al., "Genetic analysis of mitochondrial protein misfolding in Drosophila melanogaster"Cell Death and Differentiation 19 (8): 1308–16 (2012).
7.     Valente et. al., "PINK1 mutations are associated with sporadic early-onset parkinsonism"Annals of Neurology 56 (3): 336–41 (2004).
8.     Dagda et. al., "Beyond the mitochondrion: cytosolic PINK1 remodels dendrites through protein kinase A"Journal of Neurochemistry 128(6):864-77 (2014).
9.     M. Vos et. al., “Vitamin K2 is a mitochondrial electron carrier that rescues PINK1 deficiency”, Science 336(6086):1306-10 (2012).
10. Nakagawa et. al., “Vitamin K2 biosynthetic enzyme, UBIAD1 is essential for embryonic development of mice” PLOS One. Aug 15;9(8):e104078 (2014).

About the Author:

Katie Jodscheidt is a Fitness Nutrition Specialist and Certified Personal Trainer through the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM). Katie is passionate about helping others improve their overall quality of life by improving their health. Her mission is to educate people on how to live a healthy lifestyle through proper diet, exercise and nutritional supplementation. With years of research on natural health alternatives and collaborating with highly trained physicians around the world, Katie founded Innerzyme in 2011. Innerzyme is revolutionizing the natural health industry with specially formulated, ethically created nutritional supplements including Vitamin K2, MK-7, 300mcg and a full range of digestive and systemic enzyme supplements. All Innerzyme supplements are made in the USA in a cGMP certified facility.

For more information:

Sunday, October 5, 2014

Innerzyme Vitamin K2 Sale at The Vitamin Shoppe | 20% OFF Natural Vitamin K2 MK-7 300mcg by Innerzyme

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Vitamin K2 Sale! Save 20% Off Innerzyme Vitamin K2, MK-7, 300mcg online at The Vitamin Shoppe during their Lettered Vitamin Sale in October! Natural Vitamin K2, MK-7, 300mcg. Vitamin K2 Supports Cardiovascular, Bone and Soft Tissue Health. Optimum quality, available in a 30ct and 90ct size. Non-GMO!

Recommended Dosage: Take 1 vegetarian capsule, 300mcg/day or as directed by your healthcare practitioner.

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Thursday, September 25, 2014

Vitamin K2 and Wrinkles | Anti-Aging Benefits of Vitamin K2, MK-7 Supplementation

 
Are wrinkles just a part of aging or could they signify a vitamin deficiency? 

The Vitamin Deficiency that is Written All Over Your Face



For more information about the health benefits of Vitamin K2, visit: www.innerzyme.com



Vitamin K2 Supplement Dosage and Side Effects


Research indicates that daily supplementation of Vitamin K2, MK-7 is linked to a longer, healthier life. 

http://www.optimumvitamink2.com/

Innerzyme Vitamin K2, MK-7, 300mcg
  • Natural Vitamin K2 supplement
  • Optimum quality
  • One a day Vitamin K2 supplement (300mcg/capsule)
  • Non-GMO
  • Available in a 30ct and 90ct size
Vitamin K2 Supplement Dosage: One capsule/day = 300mcg or as directed by your healthcare practitioner.

Vitamin K2 Supplement Side Effects: In healthy individuals, research has not reported any side effects, adverse reactions or known toxicity as a result of large doses of Vitamin K.  However, individuals on anticoagulants such as warfarin should consult their healthcare professional before adding a Vitamin K2 supplement to their daily regimen.